Indicators

The Australian Health Performance Framework (AHPF) is a tool for reporting on the health of Australians, the performance of health care in Australia and the Australian health system. The 45 indicators within the framework can be disaggregated and analysed through selected population groups, providing a rich source of information at the National, State and Territory and local levels (where data available).

The AHPF reports on a number of risk factors relating to health behaviours, biomedical factors and socioeconomic factors, including:

  • AHPF Indicator: Prevalence of overweight and obesity
    The proportion of children (aged 2–17) and adults (aged 18 and over) who are overweight or obese using the Body Mass Index (BMI) measure. Available data: National - State & Territory - Primary Health Network.
  • AHPF Indicator: Levels of risky alcohol consumption
    The proportion of adults (aged 18 and over) at risk of long-term harm from alcohol (consuming more than 2 standard drinks per day on average), based on the Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol. Available data: National - State & Territory - Primary Health Network.
  • AHPF Indicator: Rates of current daily smokers
    The proportion of adults (aged 18 and over) who are current daily smokers. Available data: National - State & Territory - Primary Health Network
  • AHPF Indicator: Inadequate fruit and vegetable intake
    The proportion of children (aged 2–17) and adults (aged 18 and over) not eating sufficient serves of fruit and vegetables each day to obtain a health benefit based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Available data: National - State & Territory.
  • AHPF Indicator: Insufficient physical activity
    The proportion of children (aged 2–17) and adults (aged 18 and over) who perform insufficient physical activity based on the Australian Physical Activity Guidelines. Available data: National - State & Territory - Primary Health Network.
  • AHPF Indicators: Socioeconomic factors
    Socioeconomic factors —such as income, employment, housing and education—can affect a person’s health. People who are disadvantaged in one or more of these areas may have difficulty accessing health care, and this may in turn impact on their overall health and wellbeing.