Reports

Featured reports

Latest reports

Asthma 

Asthma is a common chronic condition that affects the airways (the breathing passage that carries air into our lungs). People with asthma experience episodes of wheezing, breathlessness and chest tightness due to widespread narrowing of the airways.

Osteoporosis 

Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin, weak and fragile, such that even a minor bump or accident can cause a broken bone (minimal trauma fracture). Osteopenia is a condition when bone mineral density is lower than normal but not low enough to be classified as osteoporosis.

Arthritis 

Arthritis is an umbrella term for a range of inflammatory conditions affecting the bones, muscles and joints. These conditions often result in pain, stiffness, swelling and redness in affected joints. They include osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile arthritis and gout. Arthritis is a common condition particularly among older Australians, and is a large contributor to illness, pain and disability.

Bronchiectasis 

Bronchiectasis is a lung disease that occurs when the walls of the breathing tubes or airways widen due to chronic inflammation and/or infection. This condition is characterised by a persistent cough with excess amounts of mucus and, often, airflow obstruction together with episodes of worsening symptoms.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), associated comorbidities and risk factors 

People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often have other chronic and long-term conditions. This is called ‘comorbidity’, which describes any additional disease that is experienced by a person with a disease of interest (the index disease). Comorbidities are typically more common in older age groups.

Osteoarthritis 

Osteoarthritis is a chronic and progressive condition that mostly affects the hands, spine and joints such as hips, knees and ankles. It is the most common form of arthritis and the predominant condition leading to knee and hip replacement surgery in Australia.

Allergic rhinitis ('hay fever') 

Allergic rhinitis can occur seasonally (commonly referred to as 'hay fever') or throughout the year. Allergic rhinitis is triggered by an allergic reaction. The symptoms may include a runny or blocked nose and/or sneezing and watery eyes. Allergic rhinitis is triggered by an allergic reaction to outdoor or indoor allergens, such as pollen, dust mites, or tiny flecks of skin and saliva shed by cats, dogs, and other animals with fur or feather.

Back problems 

Back problems are a range of conditions related to the bones, joints, connective tissue, muscles and nerves of the back. Back problems are a significant cause of disability and lost productivity.

Profiles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with kidney disease 

Biomedical test results from the 2012–13 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey found that almost 1 in 5 Indigenous Australian adults showed signs of chronic kidney disease. This report shows that the likelihood of having chronic kidney disease increases with age, and is higher among people with high blood pressure or diabetes, and among those living in remote areas. It also shows that rates of hospitalisation for kidney disease or treatment for end-stage kidney disease among Indigenous Australians tends to be highest in remote areas, particularly in Central Australia.

Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015: Interactive data on disease burden 

Burden of disease is a measure of the years of healthy life lost from living with, or dying from disease and injury. The interactive data visualisations display burden estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015. Estimates for specific diseases and injuries for Australia are for the years 2003, 2011 and 2015 and for state/territory, remoteness area and socioeconomic group for 2011 and 2015.

New analyses of the key drivers of change over time in overall disease burden and for the top 50 diseases and injuries have recently been added to these data visualisations (August 2020).

There is also another interactive data set to explore: risk factor burden.

Diabetes 

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has developed core monitoring information on the prevalence, incidence, hospitalisation and deaths from diabetes (including type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes) in Australia that is updated on a regular basis on the AIHW website to ensure that the most up-to-date information and trends are easily accessible and available.

Chronic kidney disease 

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has developed core monitoring information on the prevalence, incidence, hospitalisation and deaths from chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Australia. This is updated on a regular basis on the AIHW website to ensure that current information and trends are readily available.

Cardiovascular disease 

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has developed core monitoring information on the incidence, prevalence, hospitalisation and deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Australia (including coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure). This is updated on a regular basis on the AIHW website to ensure that current information and trends are readily available.

Chronic pain in Australia 

Chronic pain is a common and complex condition characterised by persistent pain experienced on most days of the week. It affects 1 in 5 Australians aged 45 and over. New analysis in this report shows that compared with people without pain, people with chronic pain are more likely to:  

  • be female and older
  • have long-term conditions
  • stay longer in hospital
  • report limitations to daily activities.

COVID-19
This release precedes COVID-19 data.

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 

The Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia web report presents the latest available data on new cases of type 1 diabetes and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. It is part of the ongoing national reporting using the National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register (NDR). The NDR is a linked data set, which includes data from the:

  • National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS)
  • Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG)
  • National Death Index.

The data are presented by age, sex, trends, population groups and geographic areas.

The health of Australia’s males 

In 2018, just under half of Australia’s population—49%, or 12.4 million people—were male. On average, Australian males experience different health outcomes to Australian females. They are more likely than females to engage in risky health behaviours and to die prematurely. They are also more likely to be homeless or in custody. Compared with females, males experienced more of their total disease burden due to dying early from disease and injury than from living with disease.

To learn more about the health outcomes of females, see The health of Australia’s females.

The health of Australia’s females 

In 2018, just over half of Australia’s population—51% or 12.6 million people—were female. On average, Australian females experience different health outcomes than Australian males. Compared with males, females have a higher life expectancy and experienced more of their total disease burden due to living with disease rather than from dying early from disease and injury. They are more likely than males to experience sexual violence and to have multiple chronic conditions.

To learn more about the health outcomes of males, see The health of Australia’s males.