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Immunisation rates for children in 2016–17 

Immunisation is important in protecting children from harmful infectious diseases. This web update presents 2016–17 immunisation rates for all children and Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islander children aged 1, 2 and 5. Rates are presented for the 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas, more than 300 smaller local areas and around 1,600 postcodes across Australia.

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

Latest reports

HPV immunisation rates in 2015–16 

Immunisation against the human papillomavirus (HPV) can prevent cervical and other cancers, and other HPV-related diseases. The National HPV Vaccination Program has been immunising adolescent girls since 2007 and was extended to boys in 2013.

This release shows HPV Immunisation rates in 2015-16. Rates are reported separately for girls and boys aged 15.  Data is reported at a national level and by PHN and SA4.

This report was first published on the former MyHealthyCommunities website.

Immunisation rates for children in 2015–16  

Immunisation is important in protecting children from harmful infectious diseases. Our most recent immunisation report shows the large majority of Australian children continue to be immunised and that rates have increased over time, but there is room for improvement in some local areas. The report focuses on immunisation rates for 5-year-old children and also includes results for children aged 1 and 2. Rates are presented for the 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas, more than 300 smaller local areas and around 1500 postcodes across Australia. Rates are also presented for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. 

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

HPV immunisation rates in 2014–15 

Immunisation against the highly contagious human papillomavirus (HPV) can prevent cervical and other cancers, and other HPV-related diseases. The National HPV Vaccination Program has been immunising adolescent girls since 2007 and was extended to boys in 2013.

This report on HPV immunisation shows the percentage of girls aged 15 across 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas who were fully immunised against HPV in 2014–15. For the first time, the percentage of boys fully immunised are also shown by PHN area.

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

Immunisation rates for children in 2014–15 

Although the percentage of children fully immunised in Australia is high, rates are not uniform across the country and there are significant variations at the local level. Low immunisation coverage rates persist across many local areas, exposing vulnerable children to vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles and whooping cough. The report looks at child immunisation rates across the 31 Primary Health Network areas as well as more than 300 smaller local areas (SA3) and Australian postcodes. Results are available via Excel downloads for SA4s (which are larger than SA3s, with just over 80 across Australia). A new interactive tool is also available to explore the data. 

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

Immunisation rates for children in 2012–13 

The second childhood immunisation rates report from the National Health Performance Authority finds the biggest improvements in immunisation rates were seen across five-year-old children, the age when they should have completed their childhood immunisations.

New data on the percentages of girls aged 15 years fully immunised against human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus known to cause cervical cancer, are also available by Medicare Local catchment for the first time in the report.

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

Immunisation rates for children in 2011–12 

The first local-level report on childhood immunisation rates finds more than 70,000 Australian children aged up to 5 years are not fully immunised. Immunisation helps protect individuals and the community generally against potentially serious diseases such as measles, polio, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis). Although the great majority of children in Australia are immunised, it is important to maintain high immunisation rates to reduce the risk of outbreaks of these and other diseases recurring.

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

Vaccination uptake among people with chronic respiratory disease 

Research has shown that vaccinations against influenza and pneumococcal infection can benefit people with obstructive airways disease, which includes asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This report reviews the limited information available in Australia on how many people with asthma and COPD have the vaccination, and finds that the uptake rate is not as high as would be expected if recommendations were being followed. It presents a range of data improvement options that would enhance our ability to monitor vaccination uptake in this and other at-risk population groups.

2009 Adult Vaccination Survey: summary results 

The 2009 Adult Vaccination Survey forms part of the evaluations of two vaccine programs for older Australia. The first is the National Influenza Vaccination Program for Older Australians, which commenced in 1999; and the second is the National Pneumococcal Vaccination Program for Older Australians which commenced on 1 January 2005. The survey showed that in 2009, 74.6% (2.2 million) Australians aged 65 years or over were vaccinated against influenza. However, only 54.4% (1.6 million) older Australians were currently vaccinated against pneumococcal.

2010 Pandemic Vaccination Survey: summary results 

This report presents results from the 2010 Pandemic Vaccination Survey conducted in January and February 2010 by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. The report provides estimates of swine flu vaccination uptake by Australians, along with the motivation for, and barriers to, vaccination. The survey showed that the swine flu vaccine uptake as of February 2010 was estimated at 18.1% (or about 3.9 million people). Some of the reasons why people wanted to get vaccinated include the seriousness of swine flu (24.7%), doctor's advice (16.8%), employment-related reasons (13.7%) and being in an 'at risk' group (10.9%).

2004 Adult Vaccination Survey: summary results 

This report presents summary results from the 2004 Adult Vaccination Survey (formerly the Influenza Vaccine Survey), which includes questions on both influenza and, for the first time, pneumococcal vaccination. The influenza questions are part of the review of the National Influenza Vaccine Program for Older Australians (aged 65 years or older). The pneumococcal questions support the setting of a baseline for monitoring pneumococcal vaccination, anticipating the evaluation of the National Pneumococcal Vaccination Program for Older Australians, which began on 1 January 2005.The survey was conducted in October 2004 and included 7,500 participants aged 18 years and over.

2003 Influenza Vaccine Survey: summary results 

The Australian Government's National Influenza Vaccine Program for Older Australians funds free vaccine for Australians aged 65 years and older. Conducted in October 2003, almost 8000 Australians aged 40 years and older participated in the 2003 survey and were asked about their recent medical and financial experience of influenza and influenza vaccination. The report presents estimates derived from participants' survey responses.

2002 Influenza Vaccine Survey: summary results 

This report was carried out as part of an evaluation of the National Influenza Vaccination Program for Older Australians. The program is a Commonwealth Government initiative designed to help reduce the impact of influenza. The survey itself involved 8000 participants across Australia, interviewed during October 2002, at the end of the winter flu season.People aged 40 years and over were asked whether they had been vaccinated against the flu, whether they had received the vaccine for free or had paid for it, and if they had any of the risk factors for flu infection or its complications.