Impact of osteoporosis

Perceived health status

2.7 x

as likely to describe poor health among those with osteoporosis, compared with those without the condition

People aged 45 and over with osteoporosis had lower self-assessed health status than people without the condition­—based on self-reported data from the ABS 2017–18 National Health Survey (NHS). People with osteoporosis were 2.7 times as likely to describe their health as poor (15%) compared with those without the condition (5.4%) (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Self-assessed health of people aged 45 and over with and without osteoporosis, 2017–18

The vertical bar chart shows that, people aged 45 and over with osteoporosis were less likely to perceive their health as excellent (7%25) or very good (23%25) compared with people without osteoporosis (17%25 and 33%25). People with osteoporosis were more likely to describe their health as fair (23%25) or poor (15%25) compared with those without osteoporosis (14%25 and 5%25 respectively).

Note: Rates are age-standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001.

Source: AIHW analysis of ABS 2019 [1] (Data table).

Pain

2.3 x

as likely to experience severe or very severe pain in those with osteoporosis, compared with those without the condition

In 2017–18, more than half of people with osteoporosis aged 45 and over (57%) experienced ‘moderate’ to ‘very severe’ pain in the last 4 weeks. People with osteoporosis were 2.3 times as likely to experience severe or very severe bodily pain in the last 4 weeks (23%) compared with those without the condition (10%) (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Pain(a) experienced by people aged 45 and over with and without osteoporosis, 2017-18

The vertical bar chart shows that, people aged 45 and over with osteoporosis were more likely to describe their pain as very severe (3%25), severe (20%25), or moderate (34%25) than people without osteoporosis (2%25, 8%25, and 23%25 respectively). People with osteoporosis were less likely to describe their pain as very mild (14%25) compared with those without osteoporosis (23%25).

a. Bodily pain experienced in the 4 weeks prior to interview

Note: Rates are age-standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001.

Source: AIHW analysis of ABS 2019 [1] (Data table).

Psychological distress

2.9 x

as likely to experience very high psychological distress in those with osteoporosis, compared with those without the condition

People aged 45 and over with osteoporosis were 2.9 times as likely to experience very high levels of psychological distress (12%) compared with those without the condition (4%)—according to the 2017–18 NHS (Figure 3).

Figure 3: Psychological distress(a) experienced by people aged 45 and over with and without osteoporosis, 2017-18

The vertical bar chart shows that, people aged 45 and over with osteoporosis were more likely to have levels of psychological distress that were moderate (26%25), high (14%25) or very high (12%25) compared with people without osteoporosis (20%25, 9%25, and 4%25 respectively). People with osteoporosis were less likely to describe their levels of psychological distress as low (49%25) compared with those without osteoporosis (68%25).

a. Psychological distress is measured using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10), which involves 10 questions about negative emotional states experienced in the previous 4 weeks. The scores are grouped into Low: K10 score 10–15, Moderate: 16–21, High: 22–29, Very high: 30–50.

Note: Rates are age-standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001.

Source: AIHW analysis of ABS 2019 [1] (Data table).

References

  1. ABS 2019. Microdata: National Health Survey, 2017-18, detailed microdata, DataLab. ABS cat no. 4324.0.55.001. Canberra: ABS. Findings based on AIHW analysis of ABS microdata.