Indicator 6. General practice encounters

Description: Per cent of the population who claimed the completion of the Asthma Cycle of Care Practice Incentive Payment (PIP) service.

GPs play an important role in the management of asthma in the community. This role includes assessment, prescription of regular medications, education and review, as well as managing acute exacerbations.

Until recently (early 2017), the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) survey has provided the most detailed source of data about general practice activity in Australia (Britt et al 2016). As the BEACH survey has been discontinued,there is currently no nationally consistent primary health care data collection to monitor the provision of care by GPs.

The completion of the Asthma Cycle of Care, which was a PIP service subsidised by Medicare until August 2019, can be used as an indication of GP care for asthma. The Asthma Cycle of Care involves at least 2 asthma-related consultations with a GP within 12 months for a patient with moderate-to-severe asthma. There are 12 MBS items for GP consultations that relate to the completion of an Asthma Cycle of Care.

Patients may also use other forms of health care to manage their asthma, such as standard and long GP consultations, Chronic Disease Management plans, and paediatric and specialist services. 

The interactive visualisations on this page show data on the completion of an Asthma Cycle of Care by age and sex.

 

Key findings

Analysis of 2017–18 Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) data shows that less than 1.0% of the population claimed the completion of the Asthma Cycle of Care PIP service. 

  • The percentage claiming the Asthma Cycle of Care was higher in females.
  • Differences in claiming the service were observed by sex and age. For males the percentage of the population claiming the service was greatest in boys aged 0–14 years. For females, the percentage of the population claiming the service was greatest in women aged 60–74 years.
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Reference

Britt H, Miller GC, Bayram C, Henderson J, Valenti L, Harrison C et al. 2016. A decade of Australian general practice activity 2006–07 to 2015–16. General practice series no. 41. Sydney: Sydney University Press.