2.03 Environmental tobacco smoke

This measure reports on the number and proportion of Indigenous children aged 0–14 who live in households with daily smokers and daily indoor smokers.

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Why is it important?

This measure reports Indigenous children aged 0–14 who live in households with daily smokers and daily indoor smokers. Environmental tobacco smoke (also known as second‑hand smoke) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. There is strong and consistent evidence that second‑hand smoke causes lung cancer and ischaemic heart disease, and is associated with an increased risk of respiratory disease in adults. It increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome and exacerbates asthma and ear infections such as otitis media in children (Thomas & Stevens 2014). Exposure to second‑hand smoke during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk in neural tube defects (Wang et al. 2014a).

Related measures

Data sources

  • Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey
  • Australian Health Survey
  • National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey
  • National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey
  • National Health Survey

References

  • Thomas DP & Stevens M 2014. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smoke‐free homes, 2002 to 2008. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health 38:147–53.
  • Wang L, Mamudu HM, Alamian A, Anderson JL & Brooks B 2014a. Independent and joint effects of prenatal maternal smoking and maternal exposure to secondhand smoke on the development of adolescent obesity: a longitudinal study. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 50:908–15.